Scholarly Journal Article

  • What is a SCHOLARLY JOURNAL ARTICLE?

    • Scholarly journal articles are lengthier articles written by scholars or researchers in a particular field.
    • Scholarly articles offer evaluation, analysis, or interpretation of a topic.
    • The audience for scholarly articles is students, scholars, and professionals in specific fields, for example. 


    EXAMPLE SCHOLARLY JOURNALS:

    Harvard Educational Review, Modern Fiction Studies, and American Journal of Sociology

     

    Note: Time Magazine, Newsweek, and The Chicago Tribune, for example, do not offer scholarly journals. These resources offer general information for the larger public. Their articles are typically more aesthetically designed and shorter but are not written for researchers or students. The more you practice finding scholarly articles, the easier it will be to distinguish between the two!


     

    How to find the right SCHOLARLY JOURNAL ARTICLE:

    1. Start with the right topic, question, or argument. This might mean gathering background information and search terms from reference sources like Wikipedia and Encyclopedia Brittanica

     

    2. Visit the best LLC Databases to start your search:

    Bloom's Literature Literature Resource Center  JSTOR  Proquest

    *don't forget to use this password document to log in to databases at home!

     

    3. Narrow your search to "full text," "peer-reviewed," and/or "literary criticism" when possible.

     

    4. You don't really need to read the article in order. Try these steps to quickly decide if an article works for you:

    • Start with the title 
    • Read the abstract or preview summary
    • Skip to the conclusion or discussion at the end of the article
      • If the information in the article still meets your need at this point, head back to the beginning and start reading from the introduction paragraph(s)

     

    5. Once you are ready, save the great articles you find to Google Drive and/or print on both sides of the page. 

     

    6. Copy and paste the provided MLA 8 citations into your Noodletools Works Cited to prove you are an expert researcher and to avoid plagiarism!